Clinical legal education and disability: accommodation, implementation and assessment in service-learning programs

Authors

  • Martha E. Simmons Osgoode Hall Law School York University
  • Marian MacGregor Osgoode Hall Law School York University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.19164/ijcle.v23i4.525

Abstract

Experiential education is becoming an increasingly relevant pedagogy in post-secondary and professional education. This paper situates service-learning within the larger context of experiential education. It provides an examination of the social model of disability and its relevance for service-learning programs. Most importantly, it then narrows in on implications of disability on program selection, implementation and assessment. The aim of the paper is to offer practical suggestions to create and maintain universally accessible programs as well as a theoretical framework from which to view these challenges and opportunities.

Author Biographies

Martha E. Simmons, Osgoode Hall Law School York University

Visiting ProfessorDirector, Mediation Clinic and Intensive ProgramOsgoode Hall Law School

Marian MacGregor, Osgoode Hall Law School York University

Clinic DirectorAdjunct Faculty, Osgoode Hall Law SchoolYork University

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Published

2016-11-30

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Reviewed Articles